Gatekeepers and Gardeners

Balance is an integral part of every job. We have to balance our priorities at work and our lives outside of work. We need to balance the time we spend building with the time we spend maintaining. We need to balance the needs of our teams with the varied needs of the rest of the organization. And that’s just the start of it.

Never does this become more apparent than for new tech leads - we see it all the time at HubSpot. When they step into the role, they usually find themselves with new (sometimes competing) priorities. I often hear that they're not sure if they're spending their time as well as they could. And when new tech leads lack balance, they might end up losing sight of what success for themselves and their teams should look like.

Read More ››

Planning a tech meetup? Here are some helpful tips

ReactJS Dublin is a quarterly meetup that I, along with a few other dedicated HubSpotters, run. We’ve been running it for almost two years - since November of 2015. In that time it’s grown from roughly 30 attendees sitting in a rented hotel room to 150 React enthusiasts at our most recent meetup, which booked out in fewer than nine hours. We have over 1,200 ‘Reactors’ at the time of writing and we’ve hosted twenty talks.

Read More ››

Quick Guide: How to put Invisible reCaptcha on your website

Google recently released a new way to prevent spam: the invisible reCaptcha. The HubSpot product team is introducing this new tool on all forms in our product soon, because it'll help customers generate more legitimate leads. Want to give it a try? You only need a few steps to add invisible reCaptcha to your website.

Read More ››

Why we treat interns like full members of the team

There are some companies that have special co-op and internship projects that are separate from their normal stream of product development. Often, the work of co-ops and interns never sees the light of day, or at least not while they're at the company.

We fundamentally do not believe in this approach. We believe that the best way to learn is by doing, and therefore, the best way to learn how to be a software engineer is to do what a software engineer does.

Read More ››

Why We Traded Scrum for “Science Fair” to Build HubSpot

We broke up with scrum about six years ago.

Agile development served us well in startup mode, but as we added more seats, opened new space, and launched new tools, it actually started to stunt our product culture’s growth. Take autonomy, for starters. We think engineers should have complete autonomy over their code and part of the product. And even though scrum is designed to protect developers from the demands and distractions of your CEO, marketing team, sales team, etc., it can actually tie their hands. There’s no trust being built between product and the rest of the company; sprints end up more like transactions than conversations.

Read More ››

Code Screen Problems Don't Have to be Unspeakably Terrible

Many software developers are familiar with a “fizzbuzz”-type problem in coding interviews. The idea is to ask a fairly trivial coding question of candidates to make sure they are competent coders. This can be done on-site, or in a phone interview format. Although well-intentioned, these kinds of questions are annoying and insulting for qualified candidates, can give false negatives as a result of trivial errors (especially if asked on a whiteboard) and are tedious for interviewers to ask.

Read More ››

Subscribe for updates

New Call-to-action